An analysis of deception and foolishness in pardoners tale by geoffrey chaucer

Then, more often than not, in the following tale the character who felt wronged in some way will take judgment into his or her own hands by telling their own tale in a way that avenges their hurt feelings or slandered estate. What then would happen if a character told a tale and did not receive a payback tale? Source Tales of Deception The Merchant's and Pardoner's tale share an epiphany of two types of repercussions--that which comes from deception and that which comes from allowing oneself to be deceived.

An analysis of deception and foolishness in pardoners tale by geoffrey chaucer

Then, more often than not, in the following tale the character who felt wronged in some way will take judgment into his or her own hands by telling their own tale in a way that avenges their hurt feelings or slandered estate.

What then would happen if a character told a tale and did not receive a payback tale? The first is the ultimate repercussions of the deceiver. She ends up associating with a being that possesses a demonic name, Damian, and the tale later suggests that she pays a severe price for her actions.

The second form of repercussion comes to those who allow themselves to be deceived, also known as blind faith. In each tale, there are repercussions for both the deceiver and the deceived.

Aside from the initial slur about the foolishness, or possibly brilliance as suggested by his friends, of an older gentleman taking a young bride as his wife, the Merchant ends up taking a girl named May in wedlock. Since Damian is often a literary name for a being with an innate presence of evil about it, one could easily infer what is about to happen.

Even when clearly caught, May continues to deceive her husband. By the end of the tale, it seems that her repercussion is to carry and bear a demon child. Symbolically, the affair with Damian suggests an affair with evil.

Since the Pardoner is a member of the clergy, he is bound to a life working in the light of God and the Church. While the Pardoner knows he is being hypocritically deceitful in his preaching to man, it was suggested that he is also being deceitful toward God because of his continuous fraud in the name of God.

In this circle, the Pardoner would pay for his sins of betrayal against God, whether he realized consciously what he was doing or not. Dante then asks Virgil why usury was a sin. Because of his ultimate deceit against God, we conclude that the Pardoner would pay a bigger price than if he were to only deceive man.

However, while Chaucer shows that the implications of being a deceiver are severe, he also subtly suggests that the implications of a blind believer could be just as bad. To those who allow themselves to be deceived, those who believe what they are told without taking into consideration their own thoughts, and those who are fearful of losing their easy lives as blind sheep led by untrustworthy shepherds, Chaucer suggests foolishness in the minds of the deceived.

Chaucer states that those who have characteristics of unintelligible conclusions in matters that are clearly defined will never change their ways. These foolish people who allow themselves to be deceived are fearful of a life outside of their lifelong deceit. Just as Chaucer has suggested all those who live a life deceived do, eventually January is swayed into believing that his wife was merely wrestling so that he may gain his sight once again.

Obviously deceived by his wife, January disregards all that he saw.

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Even though Pluto opened up his physical eyes so that his mind could see the trickery that was displayed before him, January did not succeed in seeing past the blindness of his mind. This demon child will be his son whom he thinks is of his own blood, but is in fact not.

He claims that those who are deceived can clearly be told that they are being deceived, but ultimately they will continue to live a life as a sham and a lie.

Chaucer reflects that those who live by false terms will live a life like January, blinded by faith and thus blinded in the mind. It seems that these people are worse than the Pardoner, because not only can they clearly see the false testimonies, they are also told of the false testimonies by the preacher giving the testimony.

Here, we see the repercussion of those who are deceived. It seems that only the Host is bold enough to stand up against the misdoing that the Pardoner clearly just displayed. Many wonder that if what the Pardoner says about his tricks is true, what ultimate meaning does this give to their life?

For many, the answer is little to no meaning. The price of the deceived is an untrue life. Their life is filled with the nagging and justified suspicion that like the scams they allow themselves to believe, their life has also turned into a scam of self deceit.

Chaucer reflects that you can tell a person the truth all you want, just as the Pardoner does in his initial preaching of his own hypocritical fashion, but, ultimately, people will believe what makes them feel most secure and untroubled in life.

People enjoy the false illusion that they are deceived into believing. When they are told of this deceit, they push the truth out of their minds and continue to live in a bubble-like fantasy land where all is good and there is no wrong that has been taught in their life.The Canterbury Tales The Pardoner's Tale Summary and Analysis Geoffrey Chaucer.

Homework Help. The Pardoner's Tale Summary and Analysis The Miller's Tale.

An analysis of deception and foolishness in pardoners tale by geoffrey chaucer

Geoffrey Chaucer. The Nun's. In The Canterbury Tales, the narrator sets out on a pilgrimage to Canterbury along with twenty-nine other people. They agree to a storytelling contest in order to pass the time. The characters. An Analysis of Deception and Foolishness in Pardoner's Tale by Geoffrey Chaucer PAGES 2.

WORDS 1, View Full Essay. More essays like this: geoffrey chaucer, the pardoners tale, deception and foolishness. Not sure what I'd do without @Kibin - Alfredo Alvarez, student @ Miami University geoffrey chaucer, the pardoners tale, deception .

A summary of Themes in Geoffrey Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales.

The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer: SHORT SUMMARY / SYNOPSIS OF THE TALES Harry Bailey, the Host, had proposed a scheme in the General Prologue whereby each pilgrim was to narrate two tales on the way to Canterbury and two more while returning. In the course of the journey the Canon and his Yeoman join the pilgrims.
The Pardoner's Tale - Wikipedia The Physician's Tale is a harrowing tale about a judge who plots with a "churl [low fellow]" to abduct a beautiful young woman; rather than allow her to be raped, her father beheads her. The invitation for the Pardoner to tell a tale comes after the Host declares his dissatisfaction with the depressing tale, and declares:

Learn exactly what happened in this chapter, scene, or section of The Canterbury Tales and what it means. Perfect for acing essays, tests, and quizzes, as well as for writing lesson plans.

Though the stories in The Canterbury Tales reflect a variety of secular and religious topics, the placement of the more religious stories implies Chaucer’s respect of Christian doctrine.

The Canterbury Tales: The Pardoner's Tale Analysis

Chaucer. Barrett Great Books 1 Dr. Carcache 11 December The Pardoner's Tale: Deception and Foolishness There are several types of foolishness being described in the Pardoner's Tale itself.

He describes gluttony in general, then specifically wine.

SparkNotes: The Canterbury Tales: The Pardoner’s Introduction, Prologue, and Tale